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but the regular officiating crews return to work tonight for a game between the cleveland browns and baltimore ravens. more now with mike pesca of npr, who's been covering the story and joins me from new york. well, mike, this was obviously not your usual labor struggle. how much did the public outcry really force the issue in the end? >> well, we just heard goodell saying it didn't, but it had to have provided leverage. here's why i think it worked or why that touchdown/interception was a major factor. it provided a cost to the whole discussion. because throughout it, the "we blame roger goodell" or "football fans blame roger goodell" but it was the owners pushing roger goodell not to settle with the officials and they could always claim "why do we have to settle with officials? they don't affect the bottom line? no one watches the game to watch a referee, they say, and maybe it's true when there's a lockout or labor strike with a factory you can always do the math and figure out how much it's costing you. so in this case the owners maybe didn't have a cost. but what that touchdown did, what
. [applause] i was a social worker for baltimore families. now, i am a social worker building opportunities for families throughout america. friends, we work on macro issues and work on the macaroni and cheese issues. when women are in the halls of power our national debate reflects the needs and dreams of american families. women leading being that congress is working to create jobs. make quality childcare more middle class. because we understand the american we love grows the economy and opportunity from the middle out, not the top down. these are our priorities. these are president obama's priorities. we know that every issue is a woman's issue.2 [applause] and equal pay for equal work is an all-american issue. the 77 cents that women make for every dollar men earn makes a real difference to our families. families stretching to make every dollar count. we are so proud that the first law signed by president barak obama was the lilly ledbetter fair pay act. the first bill was about america's first principles. equality, opportunity, and prosperity. now, those republicans in the senate tried
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